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Veterinary Laser Therapy for Equine, Pets, Dogs, Cats, Animals

Veterinary Laser Therapy

Laser Therapy for Equine and Pets

Contents:

Laser Therapy for Pets & Equine
Veterinary Laser Therapy Treatments
Veterinary Laser Therapy Sample Protocols

Class 3 vs Class 4 Lasers for Veterinary Laser Therapy


Wound Healing









 


Veterinary Laser Therapy Reviews

Dr. Bruce Meuth DVM discusses his experiences treating pets with the Microlight ML830 Cold Laser. Dr. Meuth uses the ML830 Cold Laser daily to treat pets in his practice.

Veterinary Laser Therapy Review Dr. Meuth



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Dr. Rachel Jones DVM discusses her experiences treating pets with the Microlight ML830 Laser.


Veterinary Laser Therapy Review Dr. Jones



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Dr. Alice Villalobos DVM Oncologist discusses her experiences treating pets with cancer, with the Microlight ML830 Laser.

Veterinary Laser Therapy Review Oncology



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Equine Laser Therapy

Sonya Van Veen, Registered Equine Massage Therapist, treats a horse suffering from a myofascial trigger point. The horse is being treated for a myofascial trigger point in her lumbar longissimus muscle, near her 4th lumbar vertebra. The procedure is to use a technique called muscle stripping, which involves applying pressure in a 45 degree angle to the muscle of interest, to locate the trigger point. Generally when pressure is applied to a trigger point it is quite painful causing the horse to move, or in this case drop her back as well as move to reduce the pressure, and the muscle (and related muscles) to go into spasm. Once the trigger point is located the laser is applied directly to the site. In this case the regular laser head was used as it was a large trigger point. the lasser is applied for a full 33 second cycle, then the therapist re-palpates using the muscle stripping technique. If the trigger point has been released the horse no longer reacts painfully to pressure. If the trigger point remains the laser can be applied at the same site untill it is released. In this case it only took 1 33 second cycle to release the trigger point, but I have used up to 4 cycles to fully release a trigger point in the horse. LLLT is better for treating trigger points than the classic "digital ischemic pressure" method as there is none of the inflammation, or residual muscle stiffness that is associated with the digital ischemic pressure method. This is especially important in performance animals such as race horses as there is no recovery time after treatment (usually 2-3 days no intense use of affected muscle with classic treatment). In the video the horse was treated, then immediately harnessed and trained.

Horse Equine Laser Therapy



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Pet Laser Therapy

Dr. Bruce Meuth DVM, Treats "Sadie" with the ML830 Laser. "Sadie" is a 13 year old canine with severe arthritic hips and back. "Sadie" was at the point where she could not stand on her own and her owners were considering putting her down. She was taking numerous medications before beginning laser treatment, including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory, synthetic opioids, and prednisone. After beginning ML830 Laser Therapy, "Sadie" has had an estimated 75%-80% improvement and has significantly lowered the amount of medication needed. "Sadies" quality of life has greatly improved and is now able to stand and walk on her own. This painless treatment is administered to "Sadie" every few weeks.

Laser Therapy for Dog



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Dr. Bruce Meuth DVM, Treats "Bird Dog" with the ML830 Laser. "Bird Dog" has had a broken leg, and has arthritic hips, knees, and back. Dr. Meuth treats each area with 2-3 33 second cycles with the ML830 Cold Laser. This painless treatment is administered to "Bird Dog" every few weeks.

Laser Therapy Treatment for Dogs



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Cold Laser Therapy was featured on ABC News. Click the link below the video to read the full article corresponding to this story.

Cold Laser Therapy for Pets



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Cold Laser Therapy was featured on ABCs Good Morning America.

Cold Laser Therapy for Veterinary



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Gary Mazzanti MD, owner and medical director of Shreveport Hyperbaric & Wound Center gives his review of the ML830 Laser. Dr. Mazzanti uses the ML830 Laser for accelerated wound healing. He reports that the ML830 Laser helps with the decreased pain of wounds. He has also seen a reduction in swelling and edema around wound sites, as well as the venus stasis dermatitis changes have improved skin around treatment area. The ML830 Laser penetrates deep into the tissue without causing heat to deeper tissue. This treatment vaso dialates the blood vessels, increasing blood flow around the site, which translates to the ability to form granulation tissue in the wound bed with reduction of pain and swelling. Dr. Mazzanti reports the ML830 Laser to decrease pain and swelling, decreased drainage around wounds, and overall acceleration of wound healing.

Laser Therapy for Wound Healing Management



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Class 3 vs Class 4 Lasers for Veterinary Laser Therapy

Class IIIb vs. Class IV:

The international system of laser classification is concerned only with the risk for eye injury and, at higher powers, skin damage. It has nothing at all to do with suitability for laser treatment, nor does it mean a generational change nor ensure any improvement in efficacy. Many different parameters are considered in eye risk evaluation (laser wavelength, beam diameter, beam divergence, exposure time, pulsing vs continuous emission, type of pulsing and more). Actually there are Class I lasers that are higher powered than many Class IV instruments! So, there is no sense in or reason for, other than deception, the term "Class IV laser therapy". For example, some manufacturers claim that their Class IV lasers (e.g. 10-60 W, 980 nm laser) offer superb penetration through tissue (from 6-to-9 inches according to one manufacturer), and that the so-called "weak" class IIIB lasers (e.g. 500 mW, 808 nm laser) hardly penetrate the surface skin barrier at all. However, in the chosen example below, the very opposite is the truth! Due primarily to its absorption by water in the tissue, 980 nm penetrates less than 808 nm, and this is not compensated by the higher power. At around 830 nm we actually have the best penetration into tissue, and increasing power only increases the depth of penetration marginally. With the higher superficial absorbance of the 980 nm laser there will be considerable heating, and, while heat is fine for many conditions, it is not of what photomedicine is constituted. It is also interesting to note the use of the term "Class IV technology". There is no specific "technology" that enables a manufacturer to choose a laser emitter that produces more than 500 mW, thus the term "Class IV technology" is simply used to infer a differential benefit that does not exist. Apart from power, the only differences between Class IIIB and IV lasers are the potential hazards and, usually, the price.


High Power Vs. Low Power

There are two extremes on the market – those promoting very low power output and those promoting very high power output. Which is best? The answer is: none of them. There is no "one size fits all" laser. Each one has its limitation. There is an increased awareness about the necessity to deliver fairly low doses over longer time to optimize anti-inflammatory results (Castano et al 2007, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17659584 as one example). This means that, at least for healing processes, low power over long time is more effective than high power over short time, even if the total energy is the same. The same goes for stimulation of cell proliferation. For temporary analgesia of painful conditions, high power over short time can give a better momentary effect, subject to certain minimum-time and maximum-power thresholds. The optimal dose windows for musculoskeletal indications, based upon the current scientific evidence, can be found at www.walt.nu. Conclusion: very high powered lasers are useful for treating large areas in short time and to obtain pain inhibition, but seemingly less effective for basic cell stimulation and are limited by a long list of contraindications. They do not penetrate much deeper due to the high output – in fact, the very act of making a high power laser 'safe' for long-duration exposures may make it less capable of penetrating as deeply as a lower-powered laser that can e.g. be applied in contact and with slight pressure to the skin. All types of medical lasers are useful within their own limitations, but the very high powered lasers are still lacking scientific documentation in spite of their increasing popularity with salesmen and their less informed customers.





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Laser Therapy for Pets & Equine

According to published Medical Reports, many acute and chronic conditions may be improved or eliminated with laser use including:

  • Acute Shoulder lameness
  • Acupuncture Points
  • Bursitis
  • Chronic renal failure
  • Cranial Cruciate strain
  • Cystitis
  • Lipoma
  • Hormonal alopecia
  • Hot Spots
  • Joint Ankalosis
  • Lick Granuloma
  • Ligament Repair


  • Lumbar pain
  • Otitis ExternaPost
  • Operative incision treatment
  • Pain Management
  • Post Ear Crop Surgery
  • Post Cruciate/Patellar
  • Post Laser Declaw
  • Pyoderma
  • Sinusitis
  • Tendonitis
  • Ulcerations
  • Wounds


How Does Laser Light Heal?

Healing with the use of light is not new. Light therapy was reported to be effective for many conditions by Hippocrates. With the development of the laser and its special properties, using light as a treatment has gained more popularity. This is because we can now use specific wavelengths of light and give accurately measured doses of energy directly to the appropriate treatment site, which was not possible with other light sources.

Low level lasers supply energy to the body in the form of non-thermal photons of light. Light is transmitted through the skin's layers (the dermis, epidermis and the subcutaneous tissue or tissue fat under the skin) at all wavelengths in the visible range. However, light waves in the near infrared ranges penetrate the deepest of all light waves in the visible spectrum. When low level laser light waves penetrate deeply into the skin, they optimize the immune responses of our blood. This has both anti-inflammatory and immunostimulate effects. It is a scientific fact that light transmitted to the blood in this way has positive effects throughout the whole body, supplying vital oxygen and energy to every cell.

What to Expect During a Laser Therapy Treatment Session

For most horses, laser therapy is quite passive. There are no pulsating shocks felt, as in forms of electronic stimulation, nor heat used as with ultrasounds. The most noticeable sensation is the touch of the probe head of the laser, as it comes in contact with the skin.

Some horses (3-5% of those undergoing light therapy) have reported a slight tingling or tapping in a nerve or along a nerve pathway. Some have noted that they are able to sense a slight feeling of warmth. But for the most part, the treatment, which may last from 2 to 20 minutes, is not noticed at all.

Following (and even during) a laser therapy session, approximately 75-80% of horses being treated can notice an immediate improvement in their condition. This will depend primarily on the type of condition and the length of time the condition has been present.

Generally, the more chronic or severe the condition, the longer it takes to respond. The majority of conditions treated will take anywhere from 4-5 or 10-18 treatments. Once again, the number of treatments depends upon the severity of the condition and its duration. If your condition does not change immediately, it may take 3-4 sessions before a dramatic or marked change is perceived.

What to Expect During a Laser Therapy Treatment Session

For most pets, laser therapy is quite passive. There are no pulsating shocks felt, as in forms of electronic stimulation, nor heat used as with ultrasounds. The most noticeable sensation is the touch of the probe head of the laser, as it comes in contact with the skin.

Some pets (3-5% of those undergoing light therapy) have reported a slight tingling or tapping in a nerve or along a nerve pathway. Some have noted that they are able to sense a slight feeling of warmth. But for the most part, the treatment, which may last from 2 to 20 minutes, is not noticed at all.

Following (and even during) a laser therapy session, approximately 75-80% of pets being treated can notice an immediate improvement in their condition. This will depend primarily on the type of condition and the length of time the condition has been present.

Generally, the more chronic or severe the condition, the longer it takes to respond. The majority of conditions treated will take anywhere from 4-5 or 10-18 treatments. Once again, the number of treatments depends upon the severity of the condition and its duration. If your condition does not change immediately, it may take 3-4 sessions before a dramatic or marked change is perceived.



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Veterinary Laser Therapy Sample Protocols:

Lick granuloma: 6 J directly on the spot in light contact mode (barely touching). It is best to use a cover to protect the lenses from blood. Treat twice weekly until the licking stops, then as needed to control the behavior.

Hip dysplasia: Both cranial and caudal to the greater trochanter of the femur, directing the beam toward the acetabulum and pressing down firmly. Use 6 J each spot for a total of 12 J per joint. Treat twice weekly until the improvement levels off (three to four weeks) and then as needed. Some will improve with a single treatment.

Oral ulcers: 6 J directly over the outside of the lips with light pressure (these areas are painful). If the patient is anesthetized use a light contact mode with one of the marked diodes directly to the ulcer. Repeat twice weekly until the ulcers heal, being sure to watch for positive results. If the cause of the ulcer (plaque, irritation, etc) is not removed, there is likely to be treatment failure.

Cranial Cruciate strain (note, if it is torn then surgery is required): 6 J to either side of the straight patellar ligament, directed into the joint with firm pressure. Treat twice weekly until lameness improves. If some improvement is not noticed within the first few treatments then reevaluate the cause of the lameness.

Lipoma: LLLT has been shown to form transitory pores in adipose cell membranes followed by the collapse of adipocytes (Lasers in Surgery and Medicine 2009 Dec:41 (10):799-809). It is being explored for body contouring by plastic surgeons. For our purposes we wished to explore the effect on lipomas. Using firm pressure and 6 J over the mass, repeating twice weekly is flattening and dispersing the fat within a couple of weeks. So far we are very encouraged with the results.

Acute Shoulder lameness: From traumatic injury, without radiographic changes: We have had several of these and one treatment of 6 J firmly pressed over both the medial and lateral glenohumeral ligaments has resulted in a normal gait within minutes of walking around in about half the cases. The others have required only one or two more treatments.

Otitis Externa: In cases with the canals too narrow to get in with an otoscope, we flush as well as we can and treat the horizontal and vertical canal with 6 J and firm pressure over the outside of the ear, just caudal to the temporomandibular joint. Within three days we can visualize the canals and tympanum and finish flushing if needed. We then give an additional 6 J of therapy. This allows whatever medication we deem appropriate (based on cytology) to be delivered according to our standard protocols.

Post-Operative incision treatment: A single treatment over the suture site is delivered using 3 J of energy, "painting" along the site, with gentle contact. The site heals in less time and with less suture reaction.

Lumbar pain: On those typical animals presenting with a "tucked under" gait, reluctant to jump or climb, we treat directly over the spine at the level of the narrowing intervertebral spaces, or if radiographs are not a possibility, the level of the tense epaxial musculature. Treatment is 6 J each over the space(s). We also treat directly over those tense muscles, using firm contact and 6 J each area.

Hot Spots: We have been having good results with a single treatment of 3 J in soft contact mode painting the area.

Pyoderma: We have only had one such case so far. It was a 9 week old Siberian husky with severe ventral thoracic staph pyoderma. It covered the entire ventral chest area extending onto the abdomen. It was very thickened and painful. We treated it with a total of 9 J, painting the area in soft contact mode and gave a Convenia injection. No other treatment was done. Owner called back three days later to report the lesion had completely resolved.

Chronic renal failure: LLLT suppresses pathological processes in nephrocytes, and can stimulate compensatory processes in the contralateral kidney in experimental models (Urologiia. 2006 May-Jun: (3): 47-50). With this in mine we treat each kidney with 6 Joules of energy as well as the standard therapy, using the laser to compliment our standard protocols.



   


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